Why Adaptive Management anyway?

October 11, 2017 | PAMF program staff The Phragmites Adaptive Management Framework (PAMF) is a new strategy for managing Phragmites in the Great Lakes basin that was initiated by the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative (GLPC) and funded by the Great Lakes Restoration...

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PAMF Summer 2017: Off to a great start

October 2, 2017 | PAMF program staff We are excited to report the kickoff for the pilot year of the Phragmites Adaptive Management Framework (PAMF)! After working with our Technical Working Group to finalize development of PAMF and ensure that the PAMF Participant...

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Common reed (Phragmites australis) gall as the limiting nesting resource of rare wetland bees and wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata & Evanioidea) in Central Europe

Petr Heneberg, Petr Bogusch, Pavlína Tauchmanová, Milan Řezáč, Alena Astapenková Ecological Engineering 108(A) DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2017.08.014 | Published online: 1 Sept 2017 Abstract Common reed (Phragmites australis) is often subject to...

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Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus modulates the phytotoxicity of Cd via combined responses of enzymes, thiolic compounds, and essential elements in the roots of Phragmites australis

Xiaochen Huang, Shishu Zhu, Shih-Hsin Ho, Li Wang, Fang Ma Chemosphere DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.08.021 | Published online: 8 Aug 2017 Abstract The positive effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on host plants under heavy metal (HM) stress...

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Changes associated with Phragmites australis invasion in plant community and soil properties: A study on three invaded communities in a wetland, Victoria, Australia

Md N. Uddin, Randall W. Robinson Limnologica - Ecology and Management of Inland Waters DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.limno.2017.07.006 | Published online: 2 Aug 2017 Abstract Phragmites australis invasion is altering plant communities and therefore, soil properties...

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Survey Results: Phrag Phriday Reboot

June 30, 2017, Great Lakes Commission Phrag Phriday is a weekly newsletter that has been bringing Phrag updates to subscribers since December 2015. We know that this newsletter can be a helpful resource for the Phrag community. To determine what's most helpful and...

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Welcome Karen Alexander to the GLPC team!

This week we're happy to welcome Karen Alexander to the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative team! Karen will be based out of the Great Lakes Commission and will be working on the Phragmites Adaptive Management Framework (PAMF). In particular, Karen will be meeting...

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Phragmites-free by 2020 in St. Thomas, Ontario

August 31, 2016 David Collins - Chair, City of St. Thomas Phragmites Control Committee   The City of St. Thomas’ plan to be “Phrag Free by 2020” sure didn’t start out that way and definitely not with that objective. It all began with a group of neighbors living...

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New Case Studies are on the way!

Katherine Hollins (Great Lakes Commission): Non-native Phragmites is managed throughout the Great Lakes region by organizations and individuals working under varying circumstances toward diverse goals. As a result, managers develop different strategies to address their specific needs, and the opportunity to learn from their successes and challenges is huge.

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Introducing the Phragmites Adaptive Management Framework (PAMF) Initiative

Abram DaSilva and Kurt Kowalski (USGS), Danielle Haak and Clint Moore (University of Georgia): Adaptive management is a type of structured decision-making that confronts and potentially reduces management uncertainty of a particular problem (Figure 1). This strategy is appropriate for managers who are able to address a problem, but must deal with uncertainty about the effectiveness of a variety of possible solutions.

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2015 GLPC Survey Results

December 23, 2015 Sarah Cook and Katherine Hollins Thanks again to everyone who participated in our survey earlier this year! Included in this blog are the results of that survey and information about the GLPC as a whole. Your feedback has been crucial in helping us...

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What to do with all that Biomass?

Kimberly Bourke: Non-native Phragmites australis dominates inland and coastal wetlands as well as other wet areas, such as roadside ditches, throughout the Great Lakes region. Management of non-native Phragmites regularly includes herbicide application, which can successfully kill off a non-native Phragmites infestation. However, many management resources do not address the abundance of aboveground biomass left…

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Native vs Non-Native Phragmites

Although invasive Phragmites australis reigns supreme in terms of publicity, it is important remember that we also have stands of native Phragmites throughout the Great Lakes region. It can be difficult to distinguish between the native and invasive haplotypes while in the field, but many resources exist to help people identify which one they are dealing with.

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Developing A Sustainable Voluntary Phragmites Treatment Program

Chuck Miller. Establishing a sustainable Phragmites management program depends on commitment from stakeholders. This commitment can be supported by helping stakeholders see the benefit of concerted action in their own communities and with light touches of local government (especially where funding and oversight is concerned).

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Popular Phragmites Control Publication Updated

Kevin Walters. Michigan DEQ has recently released the newly updated third edition of the Guide to the Control and Management of Invasive Phragmites. In addition to sections on understanding biology and impacts, the guide provides methods and recommended strategies for control, including information about the use of herbicides, prescribed fire, mechanical treatment and water level management.

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Hybrid Phragmites australis in North America

Kristin Saltonstall, Bernd Blossey. The lack of evidence for hybridization between native and introduced Phragmites australis in North America has puzzled researchers for over a decade. The two lineages are found together over the entire range of native P. australis subsp. americanus and have overlapping flowering periods, yet only isolated cases of hybrids have been identified.

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Evaluating Efficacy of Phragmites Treatments on the Western Lake Erie Coastline

Jennifer Thieme, Chris May, Tara Baranowski. The Lake Erie Cooperative Weed Management Area (LECWMA) treated large stands of Phragmites using combinations of aerial and ground herbicide application, mowing, mechanical crushing, prescribed fire, and reseeding with native seed. Monitoring the response of Phragmites and native vegetation was an important component of this project.

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Successful Phragmites Control in Northeast Ohio Watersheds

Karen Adair. She is the Central Lake Erie Watersheds Project Manager at The Nature Conservancy in Ohio. She develops projects to holistically manage invasive species in Northeast Ohio watersheds. She recently shared tips for “Successful Phragmites Control” in a presentation to the Midwest Invasive Plants Network and the Ohio Invasive Plants Council.

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Phragmites and Herpetofauna

David Mifsud. Reptiles and Amphibians – collectively, herpetofauna – are ecologically important groups that fill a critical mid-level position in food webs; serving as predators, scavengers, and important prey for higher predators. Occupying such a unique position, herpetofauna are key bioindicators of ecosystem health and habitat quality as they are typically sensitive to disruption in the environment

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Success Stories from the Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network

Katie Grzesiak. Northwest Michigan is facing habitat challenges from invasive Phragmites, just like much of the rest of the Great Lakes. The Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network (ISN) is working to control Phragmites along the Lake Michigan shoreline and inland in Benzie, Grand Traverse, Leelanau, and Manistee counties with good success.

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Cooperative Weed Management Areas Collaborate to Manage Phragmites

Kate Howe. Despite a land owner or natural resource manager’s best efforts to remove every Phragmites plant from the property he or she manages, the effort is doomed to failure if neighboring properties still harbor Phragmites that can readily invade managed areas. Long-term control is only likely to be successful when managed at a landscape scale through collaboration among land owners and managers.

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Phragmites Treatment and Management Prioritization Tool

Kevin Walters. While the invasive Phragmites has become widespread in much of the Great Lakes region, limited funding and resources dictate that groups trying to manage it regionally should carefully prioritize management sites to improve the likelihood of accomplishing management goals. The prioritization tool will allow those groups to rank many sites and focus on the highest priority locations first.

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Weedy Grasses as Pellet Fuel Feedstock: Research Update

Gregory Zimmerman. For the past several years, our research team has been experimenting with the use of weedy grasses for making heating pellets(to be used to heat your home). The focus of the project is to find economic uses for these weedy grasses as well as reduce greenhouse gas inputs into the atmosphere and improve farm finances

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Survey results!

Thank you to the 152 people who have responded to our survey. We're so excited to have your input and are working to address the needs that were identified. Curious? Check out the results: Final report on stakeholder survey to inform the Great Lakes Phragmites...

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Please take our survey!

Thank you for your interest in the Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative! We need you to tell us more about what you think the Collaborative can and should be.  Please take our short, 5 minute survey by clicking on the link below. Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative...

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Share your knowledge with us

The Great Lakes Phragmites Collaborative is interested in learning about new research, resources and communication relevant to Phragmites. If we've missed something or you have new a resource to share, please contact Heather...

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